https://youtu.be/1g0OZMFx81Q Context in Culture and Community: Understanding the Concepts of Counseling Kevin Dahill-Fuchel   I'm really pleased to be here with Dr. Wenimo Okoya, who is the founder and director of the Healing Schools Project. Wenimo Okoya, Ed.D., MPH   It's awesome to be here.  Katherine Potts   We're glad to have you. We are almost in July, and I'm wondering - what do we do now? Do we wait around until the next school year? Don't we do anything for teachers and students? What does that look like from a mental health space, as we've worked hard this year to integrate that as a priority? We can lose some time over the summer, and it makes it hard to come back. What are your organizations doing to remedy that? Kevin Dahill-Fuchel   The issue you're raising there, Kat, is so present for me in Counseling In Schools work this year, connecting with schools and school communities. When you get to this time of the year, people are looking forward to getting some rest. This year really feels different. I think over the last two years, people have tried to hold a lot for students as well as themselves in their own lives. I don't think it's going to work just to turn the page because the calendar page turned to summer break. There's an idea that distance from the work will help us get rejuvenation, but there's a strong recognition from the people who work in schools as well as our staff that that just isn't the case. I'm excited by what Healing Schools Project does in general, but certainly what you're focusing on in the summer. Wenimo Okoya, Ed.D., MPH   I'm happy that there's attention and that organizations like ours are paying attention to this. I taught in Newark, New Jersey, years ago. And I remember getting to June, being super excited for the...

https://youtu.be/gy0x63LkVls Context in Culture and Community: Understanding the Concepts of Counseling Katherine Potts   Today, we will be talking about what is sometimes a stigma behind counseling and some of the fears that some parents, teachers, or kids can have around it. "What if I'm labeled," for instance, and how can that stop people in a school environment from getting the help they need? Kevin Dahill-Fuchel   This is one of those topics that brings into focus the cultural context in which we're working. And you need to understand the community you're working in, the people you're working with, the issues you're speaking to, and how issues may be understood. Because the Western, quasi-European approach to counseling and maybe therapy lands very differently and can sometimes feel like an insult to some families. It can feel to some students like they're going to be labeled as something, or be defined in a certain way. As though there's a character flaw or something that they're doing wrong. Those are heavy things that people carry with them when first approached about emotional well-being or mental health that we want to strengthen and support. We've learned that one way to approach counseling in a cultural context is first to understand where people are starting from, how the mind develops, and how emotion develops. Katherine Potts   A key thing you just said was the verbiage around strengthening versus having a negative connotation around a problem or thinking you are a problem. It's essential to approach a family or a student simply with, "We're noticing this," and help them not carry extra weight. Kevin Dahill-Fuchel   When this type of work is considered, you're already starting down that road of resistance for some folks. No one wants to hear they have a problem, particularly where wellness or mental health is involved. What we want people to understand...

https://youtu.be/eSkHUUdFonA Personalizing the Pivot: How Counseling In Schools Made "Virtual" Into "Actual" Katherine Potts   Hey everyone, welcome back to Awakin. This is your host, Kat Potts, and I'm back here with Kevin Dahill-Fuchel . Hey, Kevin. Glad to have you back. Today we're going to be talking about the story of the pivot and how Counseling In Schools was able to pivot to going from in-person to virtual. And there are a couple of different buckets here. There's the emotional toll it takes; there's the productivity toll, and technology privilege. Kevin Dahill-Fuchel   Those are the big ones. The first thing that comes to mind is just the space we work in and the people who work for Counseling In Schools. There's a sense that we're prepared for a lot. If you work in a school environment, providing social and emotional support services, no one day looks like any other. So there's certainly a sense that as an organization, as a staff, we are not sitting in some very rigid routines. We're always responding to what our clients are experiencing. And while we were all experiencing the pandemic, I think none of us left the idea that the students, the families, and the communities that we work with were at a different level of peril, being isolated and disconnected. We wanted to ensure that we did not let go of those relationships, that we maintained that connection and didn't just sink into disconnection. I felt that from across our organization, there was a compelling need to stay engaged. Do not lose connection. Katherine Potts   Some people may argue that this pandemic is a once-in-a-lifetime thing that we might experience. But it also raises the question, what do we prioritize? The connection is the most significant thing, and if you're focusing on the connection, then what does that mean...

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